Day 12, Gratitude for No Knead Grandmother Bread


I am grateful for Suzanne McMinn’s No Knead Grandmother Bread.

Bread

Bread

If you despair of making homemade artisan bread and don’t really want to pay $8 a loaf of bread with ingredients list that looks like a verse from the Bible… I have a recipe gift for you! Although, I make stuffed french bread weekly, it’s for my husband’s sandwiches. I appreciate it but can resist (except if there is gumbo around to slop it up with a lovely piece of baguette) My  husband and Mukki are fanboys of my baguettes! Mukki can hear me slice a baguette from anywhere on our property and he comes running! Chickens in the Road is a wonderful web site and blog by Author Suzanne McMinn, a romance writer who went to live on a farm in West Virginia with her children. Check out her wonderful saga, xxx. The site is full of author and reader contributed recipes. One, I tried because it seemed too simple to be true! No Knead Grandmother Bread. I have read the theory on other sites, how and why you can get away with no kneading yet make great bread. I tried it and was amazed. I love this bread and if you keep it going, it gets more sour -yes, sourdough bread! How easy is it? Read the recipe here: No-Knead Grandmother Bread There are also variations on the site. Today, I am making my own variation. It is a mix of Great River Seven Grain flour, Great River Bread Flour and Great River All Purpose Flour. I had bought a large order to try something new. I usually buy 25 pound bags from King Arthur. My dear husband did not like the Seven Grain Flour, which I do, so it’s back to King Arthur for him and use up the Great River for my artisan loaves and crackers. Here is my new year no knead attempt:

Ingredients:

Grandmother dough after one hour. Mukki watching.

Grandmother dough after one hour. Mukki watching.

  • 7 cups of the flour mix
  • 3 cups warm water
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tablespoon Yeast

Method:

  1. Mix all ingredients well.
  2. Allow to rise for 2 hours at room temperature.
  3. Place container into the fridge 3 hours or overnight.
  4. When ready to use, punch down dough.
  5. Sprinkle with flour and cut out a chunk with a large spoon or metal scraper.
  6. Put remaining dough back in fridge. Use until only a cup remains and make a new recipe, added to the remaining original.
  7. Shape your dough with floured hands and allow to rise about 90 minutes.
  8. Slash dough and bake in hot oven. I usually bake breads at 450-500° on a pizza stone. I bake until internal temps are 190°. So the first batch will require watching to determine baking conditions for the rest.

Note: I use a dough spoon and a 6 quart container. You’ll need space in your fridge for this container. I also did not use dough enhancer this time but will add to second batch, to see difference. I also use large plastic containers to rise my bread, it keeps it safe from the husky hair we have everywhere!

Advertisements